An Overview of the Commission’s Case Against Google

In May 2012, the European Commission announced that it had identified four areas “where Google business practices may be considered as abuses of dominance”:   Search manipulation: The Commission was concerned that Google eliminates competition from specialised search engines—those focusing on specific areas such as travel, local reviews, mapping, and shopping—by artificially demoting them in … read more

Responding to Googlespeak: Part 5

Myth 5: Our practices haven’t caused any harm. Rather than challenge the Commission’s SO head on and argue that it should be free to exploit its massive dominance in search to divert users away from relevant competing sites and toward its own, less-relevant sites, Google’s main argument appears to be a variant of the “no … read more

Responding to Googlespeak: Part 4

Myth 4: Competitors don’t want us to include our own services in search results. In characterizing the Commission’s SO, Google claims it is based on allegations by competitors that “Google’s practice of including our own specialized results…in search have significantly harmed their businesses” (emphasis added).   Fact 4: Competitors just want Google to let them … read more

Responding to Googlespeak: Part 2

Myth 2: The popularity of Amazon and eBay shows that competition is thriving.   Google’s blog post includes graphs on “Shopping Sites” in Germany, France, and the UK, which purport to show that Amazon and eBay receive more online traffic than Google Shopping. According to Google, this proves that “(a) there’s a ton of competition … read more

Responding to Googlespeak: Confronting Google’s Arguments

On April 15, the European Commission announced that it had issued a Statement of Objections (SO) to Google for illegally abusing its dominance in search, and that it was opening a separate investigation into abuses involving Android, Google’s mobile operating system. In response, Google issued two blog posts “strongly disagree[ing] with” the Commission and setting … read more

Questions Raised by Google’s Response to the Statement of Objections

By the time Commissioner Vestager had made her announcement this week that Google were to be issued a Statement of Objections, the company had released their response, strangely titled “A Search for Harm”, on their blog setting out their initial arguments against the Commission’s finding. They had already laid the groundwork to this response with … read more

Come on, Google, address the facts

This week, the European Commission announced a Statement of Objections (SO) against Google, confirming that Google is dominant in search and that is has illegally abused that dominance. Immediately prior to that announcement, Google sent an internal memo to its staff in which it attempted to explain away the Commission’s concerns. The memo was soon … read more

ICOMP Statement: Confirmation of an SO Against Google

“Commissioner Vestager’s bold decision to send a Statement of Objections (SO) to Google and open a separate investigation into Google’s Android platform are significant developments in the long running formal investigations into the company. It will be greeted by relief among complainants, harmed businesses and consumers across Europe.”  “An SO cannot be dismissed as a … read more

ICOMP Statement in response to leaked reports of Statement of Objections

If the FT report that Google is to be served with a Statement of Objections by the European Commission: “Europe to accuse Google of illegally abusing its dominance”, is accurate, then this is a very significant development. A Statement of Objections represents a formal finding by the Commission that Google is dominant and that its … read more

What a Statement of Objections would mean for Google

Over the past few days, the world’s media have reported on various rumours from Brussels’ that the European Commission (EC) will decide ‘very soon’ on its next steps in the antitrust case against Google. Significant and in-depth articles have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, Financial Times, on Charles Arthur’s widely respected blog The OverSpill … read more